An analysis of william shakespeares play hamlet in terms of aristotles poetics

One example may be found in Oedipus the King, where all of the action takes place in one setting, and where the geographical setting of the play, in terms of a historical context, does not in itself add any meaning.

The gravediggers are common men and therefore, speak as thought they are common men. Catharsis — spectator motivated to purge his own tragic flaw. The tragic element also arises from his status in society — because he is the king and what happens to him will have wide social repercussions.

Aristotle would not approve of all the subplots that occur within this play. Misfortune versus tragedy — there is unsurprisingly a very big gap between the way we view life and the viewpoint of the ancient Greeks. The tragic drama of his day was not the same as that of the fifth century, and to a certain extent his work must be construed as a historical study of a genre that no longer existed rather than as a description of a living art form.

It is also complete in the sense that all the loose ends are tied together in a sensible, believable manner. He is confused, paranoid, and angered about the circumstances surrounding his father's death.

Repulsed by the hypocrite PoloniusHamlet stabs him through the curtain behind which he has been eavesdropping in Act III. This is not to say that everything happens in the same day; it obviously cannot, but the impression is of an abstract day unfolding. Aristotle states that tragedy is "an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude" p.

It is accompanied by Recognition, which is "a change from ignorance to knowledge, producing love or hate between the persons destined by the poet for good or bad fortune" p. For instance, the king speaks like a king; he always dodges like a true politician.

Agamemnon, The Choephori, and The Eumenides

Hamlet later finds the king in a church praying and is tempted to kill him there, but decides against it because he will go to heaven since he is praying. For instance, Aristotle states that in a great tragedy, there should be unity of time, place, and action.

Hamlet is an excellent example of this. The protagonist should be written in such a way that the audience is motivated to empathize or identify with him because the overall aim of tragedy as a genre is to excite pity and fear in the spectator.

Hamlet undoubtedly suffers this unmerited misfortune. As the entire court of Denmark lies dead in the castle, the "tender" prince has taken the reign of the country.

Hamlet is a wealthy prince, however he deals with the same problems as the common man. Aristotle states that tragedy is an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude p. The audience feels sympathy and therefore feels pity.

It is not the fact that he does not have some sympathetic qualities; rather he has too few sympathetic characteristics which we wish to empathize. Aristotle states that tragedy is "an imitation of an action that is serious, complete, and of a certain magnitude" p.

The play spans over a significant period of time. Hamlet later finds the king in a church praying and is tempted to kill him there, but decides against it because he will go to heaven since he is praying. It is also complete in the sense that all the loose ends are tied together in a sensible, believable manner.

The irony is that the characters who most enjoy life are those who face death on a regular basis. Aristotle says that "pity is aroused by unmerited misfortune, fear by the misfortune of a man like ourselves. Hamlet wants to do the right things, but it is the way he does them that makes us dislike him.

Moreover, these interpretations assume that the fear and pity aroused by tragedy is purged throughout the play, resulting in the state of katharsis. The first scene takes place at approximately midnight as does Act 1,nScene 4. The characters are supposed to be the most perfect people whom the audience can still relate to.

The play centers around Hamlet's quest to avenge his father's death; this is a serious action. Fortinbras seeks a Christian revenge and is successful. The fear of impending evil is also prevalent in the play.

Hamlet has the chance to do good, in this case revenge a murderer, but he lets passion sway his reason. For this reason, tragedy must deal with the lives of great men because only their actions will be of consequence to the larger community.

Part One, the exposition, outlines the situation, introduces the main characters, and begins the action. The play spans over a significant period of time and the action occurs in various settings ranging from the palace to a plain in Denmark.

Home:Hamlet Analyzed In Terms Of Aristotle's Poetics

There is an obvious and necessary difference between the way he speaks and the way the gravediggers speak. How then does one distinguish a simple play of comedy from a great Aristotelian drama?William Shakespeare’s play Hamlet is a well known play that falls under the genre of a tragedy because it’s very dramatic, contains numerous murders and has an overall suspenseful atmosphere throughout the play.

Mar 14,  · William Shakespeare’s famous play concerning the downfall of a Moorish general interweaves jealousy, suspense, intrigue, murder, and suicide to create a magnificent tragedy of the highest Aristotelian order.

Hamlet Analyzed According To Aristotle's Six Elements Of Tragedy Aristotle's Poetics is considered the guide to a well written tragedy; his methods have been used for centuries. In this guide, he sets out the six elements that compose a great tragedy.

An analysis of aristotles poetics

Shakespeare's Use of Aristotle's Guidelines to Tragedy in Creating the Play Othello Words 7 Pages Throughout time, the tragedy has been seen as the most emotionally pleasing form of drama, because of its ability to bring the viewer into the drama and feel for the characters, especially the tragic hero.

A tragedy, Aristotle wrote, is the imitation in dramatic form of an action that is serious and complete, with incidents arousing pity and fear; this drama, then, effects a. William Shakespeare, in his play Macbeth, historically portrays the nobility of the protagonist and his gradual descent into an ambitious fiend whose disregard for the great chain of being cost him his honour, wife and status.

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An analysis of william shakespeares play hamlet in terms of aristotles poetics
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